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Massive East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instability

Sunset on the Sabrina Coast, East Antarctica

The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet), more than any other ice sheet on the planet. It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing mass even as ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland shrink.

But new research, led by The University of Texas at Austin and the University of South Florida (USF) and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), found that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet may not ...

More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243902&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


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Six-decade-old space mystery solved with shoebox-sized satellite called a CubeSat

Researchers test the CubeSat

A 60-year-old mystery about the source of energetic, potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts has been solved using data from a shoebox-sized satellite built and operated by students. The satellite is called a CubeSat.

Imagine a fully instrumented satellite the size of a half-gallon milk carton. Then imagine that milk carton whirling in space, catching never-before-seen glimpses of atmospheric and geospace processes.

CubeSats, named for the roughly ...

More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243964&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


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NSF announces James Ulvestad as Chief Officer for Research Facilities

Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is pleased to announce that James S. Ulvestad will serve as the agency's first Chief Officer for Research Facilities (CORF), a position created in recognition of the critical role research infrastructure plays in science and engineering.

"For almost seven decades, NSF has helped build the research infrastructure that allows the United States to be a world leader in discovery and the generation of new knowledge," said NSF Director France A. ...

More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243975&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


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Dust on the wind: Study reveals surprising role of dust in mountain ecosystems

Sierra Nevada Mountain forests

Find related stories on NSF's Critical Zone Observatories at this link.

Trees growing atop granite in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains rely on nutrients from windborne dust more than on nutrients from the underlying bedrock.

This surprising finding resulted from a study led by University of Wyoming (UW) scientists. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation ...

More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243817&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


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Massive primordial galaxies found in ‘halo’ of dark matter

The Aurora Australis, or Southern Lights

Observations of two galaxies made with the National Science Foundation-funded Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope suggest that large galaxies formed faster than scientists had previously thought.

The two galaxies, first discovered by the South Pole Telescope at NSF's Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica, were massive and star-filled at a time when the cosmos was less than a billion years old.

The observation came as a surprise, ...

More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243892&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


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